Recent Updates

  1. Interpreting Manure Sample Test Results

    Applying the appropriate amount of manure requires correct interpretation of the manure test results. Moisture and nutrient levels on the test results need to match the crop’s nutrient needs. Under-application of manure will not meet the crop’s needs and over-application may allow excess nutrients to escape into ground or surface water resources. This fact sheet focuses on interpreting test results from manure samples. 
  2. Cool-Season Turfgrasses for Sports Fields and Recreational Areas

    Selection of the proper turfgrass species is one of the most important decisions to be made when establishing a playing surface or recreational area. Since the turf is meant to be permanent, it is important to select a grass species adapted to the area and to the intended level of management. The most important criteria when selecting grass species for recreational areas can be summarized as:
  3. Using a waterslide to introduce STEM to younger youth

    According to the National 4-H Council’s STEM Research website, 60 percent of youth who participate in 4-H STEM programs express a strong interest in a career in a science-related field. Given the need for an increased scientific employee base, this is promising news.  
  4. Remote Sensing in Precision Agriculture

    Disclaimer – The information presented here is intended for practitioners interested in utilizing remote sensed imagery within analytical processes for field planning, development of recommendations and farm management where spatial and temporal quality are important.
  5. Preserving Water for Emergency Use

    In times of natural disasters, floods and unexpected water outages, having a safe water supply for your family is crucial. Storage needs should be estimated at 1 gallon of water per person, per day. A normally active person needs to drink at least 2 quarts of water per day (more in warmer climates). Additional clean water is needed for food preparation. If you have been warned ahead of time, fill large pots and pans, sinks and bathtubs with water.
  6. Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2015-16

    Ohio cropland values and cash rental rates are projected to decrease in 2016. According to the Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents Survey, bare cropland values in western Ohio are expected to decrease from 4.8 to 11.1 percent in 2016 depending on the region and land class. Cash rents are expected to decline from 5.6 percent to 7.6 percent depending on the region and land class.
  7. Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2014-15

    Ohio cropland values and cash rental rates are projected to decrease in 2015. According to the Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents Survey, bare cropland values in western Ohio are expected to decrease from 5.2 to 11.9 percent in 2015 depending on the region and land class. Cash rents are expected to decrease from 6.2 to 8.5 percent depending on the region and land class.  
  8. Leading Recreation at a 4-H Community Club Meeting

    The typical 4-H community club meeting incorporates fun and learning in various forms like the business meeting, demonstrations, and project bookwork.  Some clubs compliment these regular meetings with special gatherings for community service, fundraising, and site visits.  With so many elements to complete in short meeting timeframes, recreation is frequently forgotten.
  9. Scoring Cows Can Improve Profits

    Scoring cows on the basis of body condition can be an effective management tool for enhancing reproductive performance within the cow herd. The critical period during the reproductive calendar for body condition is at calving. Problems associated with body condition can surface in several ways: 
  10. Effects of Flooding and Ponding on Corn

    The extent to which flooding injures corn is determined by several factors including plant stage of development when flooding occurs, the duration of flooding and air/soil temperatures. Prior to the 6-leaf stage (when the growing point is near or at the soil surface), corn can survive only 2 to 4 days of flooded conditions. Once corn has reached the silking stage shallow depths of flooding will not cause any noticeable amounts of damage. If temperatures are warm during flooding (greater than 77 degrees Fahrenheit) plants may not survive 24 hours. Cooler temperatures prolong survival.

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